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In the news today, Feb. 12

Last Updated Feb 12, 2018 at 7:20 am EST

Canada's Scott Moir, left to right, Tessa Virtue, Eric Radford, Meagan Duhamel, Kaetlyn Osmond, Gabrielle Daleman, and Patrick Chan celebrate their gold medal victory in the team figure skating event at the Pyeonchang Winter Olympics Monday, February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Five stories in the news for Monday, Feb. 12

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CANADA GETS GOLD IN PYEONGCHANG

Canada has its first gold medal of the Pyeongchang Olympics. Gabrielle Daleman clinched the top spot in the team figure skating competition after finishing third in the women’s free skate, before teammates Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir won the ice dance segment of the event. Canada’s gold was set up earlier in the day by three-time world champion Patrick Chan after he placed first in the men’s free program.

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SENTENCING HEARING TODAY IN BABCOCK CASE

A sentencing hearing is scheduled today for two men found guilty of first-degree murder in the presumed death of a Toronto woman who vanished five years ago. A jury found Dellen Millard and Mark Smich guilty of killing Laura Babcock in 2012. The pair were previously convicted of first-degree murder in the 2013 death of Hamilton man Tim Bosma. First-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence with no parole for at least 25 years. The judge must decide, however, if he’ll impose a consecutive or concurrent parole ineligibility period.

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SOBEYS PULLS SUPPORT FROM WELLNESS EXPO

Sobeys has ended its sponsorship of a series of “wellness” expositions due to the involvement of a man convicted in the death of his toddler son. The grocery chain said on Sunday that it couldn’t support the decision by the Health and Wellness Expos of Canada to hire David Stephan as a speaker at several events. By Sunday afternoon, Stephan’s name had been removed from the expo’s website. In 2016, Stephan and his wife were found guilty at a trial in Lethbridge, Alta., of failing to provide the necessaries of life in their son’s 2012 death from bacterial meningitis.

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SCIENTISTS DEMAND CHANGES IN CANADA’S POLLUTION LAW

Justin Trudeau will be getting a letter today signed by more than 540 scientists and doctors from across the country. They want the prime minister to change the Canadian Environmental Protection Act to put the onus on companies to prove their products are safe before they go to market. They also suggest it’s time Canada had national, enforceable air quality standards. The scientists say Trudeau has a “once-in-a-generation opportunity” to curb pollution, save lives, boost the economy and improve the quality of life for all Canadians.

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B.C. RESEARCHERS CREATE CHEAPER, FASTER MICROSCOPE

Scientists say a new microscope developed at a B.C. university could rapidly accelerate research on molecules. Nancy Forde, a physics professor at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, says the mini-radio centrifuge force microscope is designed to test the strength of molecules and can complete a decade’s worth of experiments in just a matter of days. And it comes at a true bargain price. The new microscope costs only $500 to build, compared with $150,000 for similar devices.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:

— The Entertainment Software Association of Canada invites Parliament Hill staff to join some of Canada’s top video game companies for an interactive showcase.

— The Public Inquiry Commission on relations between Indigenous Peoples and certain public services in Quebec holds hearings in Montreal.

— CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie holds a public forum in Winnipeg as part of a cross-country tour to visit every CFL market.

— Abdulahi Hasan Sharif, charged with attempting to murder an Edmonton police officer, to return to court.

— Filipino Canadian Advocacy Network holds a press conference in Vancouver to urge Ottawa to ensure permanent residency for all caregivers and migrant workers.

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