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Robot finds 'monster' in Loch Ness - but it's a movie prop

Last Updated Apr 14, 2016 at 9:35 am EST

Sonar image of a Loch Ness monster movie prop found resting on a crest on the bottom of the Loch. KONGSBERG MARITIME.

An underwater robot exploring Loch Ness has discovered a dark, monster-shaped mass in its depths.

Disappointingly, tourism officials said the nine-metre object is not the fabled Loch Ness Monster, but a prop left over from a 1970 film.

Billy Wilder’s “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes” puts the great detective on the trail of the monster, which turns out to be a disguised submarine.

The underwater robot, operated by Norwegian company Kongsberg Maritime, discovered the movie prop in Loch Ness. Photo via Twitter/@VisitScotNews.
The underwater robot, operated by Norwegian company Kongsberg Maritime, discovered the movie prop in Loch Ness. Photo via Twitter/@VisitScotNews.

 

A model of the submarine-monster sank during production to the bottom of the 230 metre-deep lake (or, as the Scottish would say, the 230 metre-deep loch).

The robot, operated by Norwegian company Kongsberg Maritime, made the discovery in the Loch.

“The vehicle allows sonars to scan just a few meters from the loch floor, giving resolution several orders of magnitude greater than anything before,” said Kongsberg Maritime engineer Craig Wallace, as quoted in Reuters.

Sonar image of a Loch Ness monster movie prop found resting on a crest on the bottom of the Loch. KONGSBERG MARITIME.
Sonar image of a Loch Ness monster movie prop found resting on a crest on the bottom of the Loch. KONGSBERG MARITIME.

 

Model of the Loch Ness Monster prop used during filming of the 1970's "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes." KONGSBERG MARITIME.
Model of the Loch Ness Monster prop used during filming of the 1970’s “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.” KONGSBERG MARITIME.

 

Tourism body Visit Scotland backed the survey of the marine robot, which has been the most detailed to date of the Loch.

Chief executive Malcolm Roughead said that whatever the survey found, “there will always be a sense of mystery and the unknown around what really lies beneath Loch Ness.”

With files from Reuters