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Some of what was said Thursday about the Liberal government's assisted dying bill

Last Updated Apr 14, 2016 at 5:20 pm EST

Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada Jody Wilson-Raybould responds to a question about assisted dying legislation tabled by the government Thursday April 14, 2016 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

OTTAWA – Some of what was said Thursday after the government introduced assisted-death legislation in the House of Commons:

“Based on the current evidence, we believe this is the best approach to ensure that dying patients who are suffering unbearable pain have the choice of a peaceful death and that the vulnerable are protected.” — Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould.

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“Medical assistance in dying is a sensitive, complex issue and many Canadians have deeply-held views on the subject.” — Wilson-Raybould.

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“Every Canadian deserves access to timely and high-quality health care, including at the end of life.” — Health Minister Jane Philpott.

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“We will also explore options to support access to medical assistance in dying, while supporting the personal convictions of health care providers.” — Philpott.

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“Today’s federal commitment to exploring mechanisms to support patient access and respect the personal convictions of health care providers will be critical to the pan-Canadian framework on medical assistance in dying. We applaud the federal government for making this commitment.” — Dr. Cindy Forbes, president, Canadian Medical Association.

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“We are deeply disappointed because we would expect this of the Harper administration, not from a government that came into power vowing to respect Canadians’ charter rights. These harsh, discriminatory rules fly in the face of that expectation and will create unfair barriers to access to medical aid in dying. We expected better.” — Shanaaz Gokool, Dying With Dignity Canada.

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“This bill does nothing to preserve a safe space for those patients who want to remain untouched by assisted suicide and euthanasia.” — Dr. Will Johnston, president of Canadian Physicians for Life.

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“It leaves out entire categories of suffering Canadians who should have a right to choose a safe and dignified assisted death. The inevitable result is that people will be trapped in intolerable suffering, or be left with no choice but to take their own lives prematurely in potentially dangerous situations.” — Josh Paterson, executive director, British Columbia Civil Liberties Association.

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“At a time when our priority should be fostering a culture of love, and enhancing resources for those suffering and facing death, assisted suicide leads us down a dark path.” — Cardinal Thomas Collins, Roman Catholic archbishop of Toronto.

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“We’ll see how the bill looks once its goes through the legislative process but the impact, there are a few differences, we will be looking at it more closely, but it’s not major. It’s not going to affect in a major way the law that was passed here in Quebec.” — provincial Justice Minister Stephanie Vallee.

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“Our goal is to ensure a balanced framework is in place for physician-assisted dying that provides appropriate safeguards for vulnerable individuals, while respecting the wishes and personal convictions of patients, families, and health care providers.” — Saskatchewan Health Minister Dustin Duncan.

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“Like all Nova Scotians and all Canadians, I’ve experienced through loved ones a peaceful end of life and also a very difficult one. The people that you care about, you want them to have a choice if that’s possible. All we are suggesting is that a conversation has to happen about what that will look like.” — Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil.

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“We’ve been working closely with the colleges of physicians and surgeons, the college of nurses and the college of pharmacists along with all the health authorities and ministry officials to ensure that we are protecting vulnerable people and making sure that the law is followed and that people have access to what will soon be available as health service in Canada.” British Columbia Health Minister Terry Lake.