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Killer Millard should be ineligible for parole until he's 102: Crown

Last Updated Nov 16, 2018 at 6:34 pm EST

A 33-year-old triple killer and aviation heir will be 102 years old before he’s eligible to apply for parole if prosecutors get their way.

The Crown and defence presented their arguments at a sentencing hearing Friday for Dellen Millard, who was found guilty in September of murdering his father, Wayne Millard, whose death was initially ruled a suicide.

It was the third first-degree murder conviction for the Toronto man, who was previously convicted of killing his former lover, Laura Babcock, and Hamilton man Tim Bosma — all over the span of 10 months in 2012 and 2013.

“There is no explanation for his crimes other than pure entitlement, depravity and evil,” said Crown attorney Jill Cameron.

“Mr. Millard is so far devoid of any remorse. After the first murder, he went on to plan his second murder, and after his second murder he went on to plan his third murder.”

Justice Maureen Forestell agreed with the Crown that Dellen Millard shot his sleeping father through the eye on Nov. 29, 2012 — a premeditated act for which the younger Millard created a false alibi.

Cameron argued that Millard should have to serve his 25 years of parole ineligibility for killing his father on top of the 50 years he is serving without parole for the other murders.

“This is to protect the public from Dellen Millard,” Cameron said. “Justice for Wayne Millard demands a separate penalty for his murder, otherwise Dellen Millard would have gotten away with it.”

First-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence with no chance for parole for 25 years. The judge presiding over the case will decide whether to impose consecutive or concurrent periods of parole ineligibility, a provision added by the federal government in 2011 to the Criminal Code for multiple murderers.

Justice Michael Code previously decided Millard was ineligible for parole for 50 years as part of his sentencing in the Babcock murder.

Millard’s lawyer, Ravin Pillay, said his client would die in prison before becoming eligible for parole at the age of 102.

“Such a sentence would crush any hope or any incentive to rehabilitate and maintain a peaceful life while in custody,” Pillay said.

Millard was arrested in May 2013 after a massive police manhunt to find Hamilton’s Bosma, a 32-year-old father of a young child. Millard and his friend Mark Smich shot and killed Bosma in his own truck, which the pair were taking for a test drive. They later burned his body in a massive animal incinerator.

The pair was also convicted of murdering Babcock, whose body has not been found, because she had become the odd woman out in a love triangle with Millard and his girlfriend.

Millard has not had any incidents behind bars, Pillay said.

“He has been a model inmate and demonstrates capacity for rehabilitation,” Pillay told court.

Janet Campbell, Wayne Millard’s girlfriend, said she’s been struggling since his death.

“I’m a widow, on my own,” she wrote in her victim impact statement that was read out in court. “My hopes for the future were stolen — and so were Wayne’s.”