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Public forced to identify themselves if being charged with violating emergency order

Last Updated Apr 1, 2020 at 6:33 am EDT

Ontario Premier Doug Ford answers questions with Health Minister Christine Elliott, Finance Minister Rod Phillips and Solicitor General Sylvia Jones listen at Queen's Park in Toronto on March 23, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Summary

It will force individuals to provide their name, date of birth and address to a provincial offences officer.


The fine for breaking an emergency order is up to $100,000 and up to one year in prison for an individual.


If you fail to identify yourself correctly, you can face a fine of $750 for failure to comply or $1,000 for obstruction.


The Ontario government will require anyone being charged under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act to identify themselves to any officer enforcing the act.

The temporary power will force individuals to provide their name, date of birth and address to a provincial offences officer, which includes police officers, First Nations constables, special constables and municipal by-law enforcement officers.

The emergency orders include the closure of all non-essential businesses, a ban of public events or social gatherings with more than five people and any price-gouging on necessary products such as disinfectant products.

The initial fine for breaking an emergency order is up to $100,000 and up to one year in prison or $10,000,000 for a corporation. If you fail to identify yourself correctly, you can face an additional fine of $750 for failure to comply or $1,000 for obstruction.

“It is the responsibility of all Ontarians to do their part and respect the emergency orders in place. We are supporting provincial offences officer in their critical work to enforce that responsibility and ensure the safety and well-being of Ontarians,” said Solicitor General Sylvia Jones in a statement.