Loading articles...

Toronto Catholic school board seeks parents' input on school reopening plan

File picture of computer accessories. (FILE/CityNews)
Summary

Boards are preparing plans for 3 scenarios: regular in-class with health protocols, remote learning, and a blend of both


TCDSB presented parents with two scenarios under the "adapted" or "blended" model


The Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) is asking parents to weigh in on one of the province’s three scenarios for the reopening of schools in the fall amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

In a letter to parents on Monday, the board said it is looking at the Ministry of Education’s three scenarios:

  • “(a) full daily return with enhanced safety measures
  • (b) adaptive model – partial daily return with distance learning
  • (c) full-time distance learning”

 

Last month, Premier Doug Ford said that with different areas of the province at different stages of reopening, the same should apply to school boards, so there won’t be a one-size-fits-all approach in schools.

Education Minister Stephen Lecce said boards are being asked to prepare plans for three scenarios: regular in-class instruction with public health protocols, fully remote learning and a plan that blends the two approaches.

Lecce said he expects all students to start September with the blended model, which will see no more than 15 students in class, attending on alternating days or weeks.

Students in class will interact only with their classmates and a single teacher. Lecce said that will keep close contact to a minimum, while still allowing students to play with some other students.

In the letter, the board said it is seeking parents’ feedback on the adaptive model (option b), “in the event that in-school classes partially resume with a blend of in-class and distance learning.”

The TCDSB presented parents with two scenarios under the “adaptive” or “blended” model:

1) Elementary students would attend school on alternate days or alternate weeks for one segment of the class at a time

2) High school students would have their school year divided into four quads — a “quadmester model.” Students would take two courses at a time and go to school every second day. They would go to school in the morning and attend only one class. Class sizes would be divided in half.

The board is asking parents to review this approach and provide their feedback in a survey by 4 p.m. on July 20.

The board will be submitting its plans to the ministry by Aug. 4.