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B.C. raises speed limit on some provincial highways

Should Ontario follow British Columbia’s lead and raise speed limits on its highways?

There could be a renewed push to raise speed limits in Ontario after the B.C. government decided to raise the speed limit on some highways to a top speed of 120 km/h, from 110 km/h.

Some drivers told 680News they would like province to raise the speed limit on Ontario highways, which is currently at 100 km/h.

“I think the speed limit on the highways is 120 km/h anyways, so I think it’s a pretty safe speed. I don’t think there’s anything dangerous about it,” Stefano from Richmond Hill said.

Police opposed the raise, saying faster drivers will increase the risk of serious crashes, but the B.C. government said it’s just bringing the posted speed limit in line with the actual speed most vehicles are travelling at.

It’s argued that the increased speed limit will also improve safety because research suggests those travelling too slow or too fast pose the highest risk of causing crashes.

The speed limit increase in B.C. took effect on Wednesday on the Coquihalla Highway between Hope and Kamloops, the Okanagan Connector from just outside Merritt to Peachland, and along the Island Highway between Parksville and Campbell River.

A pilot project is also planned for sections of the Coquihalla Highway, Highway 1 between Sicamous and Revelstoke, and parts of the Sea-to-Sky Highway north of Vancouver.

A review was undertaken to assess four key aspects of road safety on rural highways, including the setting of appropriate speed limits, requirements for winter tires, keep right except to pass, and wildlife collisions.

For the speed limit portion of the review, the ministry assessed about 9,100 kilometres of rural provincial highway.

Should the speed limit be increased? Below is some of your reaction:

With files from Carl Hanstke, 680News; News1130 and The Canadian Press