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Man shot by Peel police was on drugs and suffering from mental illness, coroner says

Last Updated Jul 29, 2015 at 9:13 pm EDT

Jermaine Carby, the man shot dead by Peel police last fall, had amphetamine, methamphetamine, marijuana and traces of an anti-depressant in his system at the time of his death, according to a coroner’s toxicology report.

But Carby’s cousin, La Tanya Grant, who allowed CityNews to view the report, said the 33-year-old did not deserve to die, regardless of his intoxication level.

“Because someone doesn’t take their meds, or someone does take recreational drugs… it doesn’t mean they should be killed,” said Grant. “We had the mayor who was on drugs but he was still operating in his office. He was not shot dead.”

Police said that on the night of Sept. 24, 2014, following a routine traffic stop, Carby began threatening officers with a large knife. An officer opened fire, hitting Carby with three bullets.

The coroner’s report also indicated Carby suffered from mental health issues, including depression, and had been in hospital seeking treatment just days before he was killed.

Grant told CityNews she believes officers on the scene should have called a mental health unit to deal with her cousin.

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU), which probes police involvement in deaths, serious injuries or allegations of sexual assault, decided in July not to charge the officer who shot Carby.

“I am satisfied that the officer discharged his firearm at Mr. Carby for the purpose of protecting and defending himself as well as other officers,” SIU Director Tony Loparco said at the time.

Loparco did, however, criticize Peel police for their handling of evidence. The knife allegedly wielded by Carby was removed from the scene by police before the SIU arrived. It was only several hours later that the weapon was turned over to investigators.

“The SIU’s integrity and the Attorney General’s integrity has to be questioned,” said Grant.

The SIU said they do not release toxicology reports at the end of an investigation, due to the possibility of a coroner’s inquest taking place in future.